Shobrick meets Cole Blaq – Neo Tokyo

 Occasionally things take time…

…so now we can finally kick off the results of our collaboration work.

Some time ago Shobrick and I collaborated for this project. Shobrick is a great photographer and director. After an introduction by Nicolas Forsans, Shobrick got in touch with me. He sent me a few images and asked if I can make a mech for a scene he had in mind. Somewhere between Shirow and Kojima. He told me about the setting and stuff, so I could get the vibe and the direction he was heading to.

 

After a few versions this 6-legged walker tank | Hexapod was finally designed. You can find the stand-alone images of the tank and building notes further down >>>. After attaching some decals to it, the Hexapod was sent to Shobrick.

Shobrick then did his magic. He gathered his crew of set designers (Paul de Laroche, Frédéric Mercier and his son Anton) and other great people help designing, creating and staging the setting. This was great to follow along while the ruins started developing with other details such as the neon signs and billboards. Once the setting was developed Shobrick took the photos at at an impressible high end performance.

And the result is breath-taking!

For more information on the production process make sure to check out Shobrick – Flickr | InstaHomepage

For Shobrick this was his last project with the bricks for now as he wants to further follow his path of being a film director. I am proud to have been able to work with him.

Enough foreword, without further ado here comes the show:


NEO TOKYO: The Story

Part 1 / Part 2 / Part 3 / Part 4

 

– image credits and copyright by Shobrick –

And the making-of videos: 1|2|3|4

– Gallery (stand alone mech) –

-Building Notes-

The model needed dynamic posing alongside articulation combined with a plausible and aesthetic pleasing design. Getting the right balance between form and function was the leading light for this build.

The first inspiration led to a direction with a dog or animal like mech. Taking a different direction, the former body was replaced by the Hexapod design later on. Only the head and the color scheme were adopted from the prior version. One reason was that there to be some kind of heavy artillery as it should be a designated war machine, staged in combat scenes. This and a plausible, functional design with ‘play’ features directed the frame to be highly articulated and moveable. The special play feature is the rotating weapons platform which in reverse direction can snug together with the head, giving it a compact and heavy armored feeling. Once rotated the cannon moves into action. Two weapon slots on the front legs allow close range combat, 8 launchers attached to the sides of the platform allow additional performance.

 

The final image series have been published in the Geek magazine S09E03

Exclusive online coverage by The Brothers Brick

Like and share this post:

John Deere Forwarder 1910 G (re-design)

A redesign of a creation from 2010.

Now with more accuracy, details and functions:

  • dual wheel suspension
  • rotating and leveling cabin
  • retractable front blade/stabilizer
  • balljoint axle connection between the engine and the trailer
  • boom arm
  • replaceable boom heads, this version features a timber milling machine
  • versatile load space

– Gallery –

Like and share this post:

Urban Sculptures Exhibition [photo update]

I was invited to be part of the group exhibition ‘URBAN SCULPTURES‘ @ Pretty Portal – Urban Art Gallery over the last weeks.

Some fresh stuff from me, which is heavy on the Graffiti|StreetArt|BrickArt side, was and is currently still on display.

– Gallery –

Thanks to widewalls for the coverage of the show.

Like and share this post:

John Deere Forwarder

You might already know that I have a soft spot for state of the art land machines. The first machine I saw when I was about 10 years old was a Mercedes Benz tractor MB 1000. I really liked the unconventional and stylish design.
When doing the brick thing I came across the John Deere Forwarder back in 2010 and made a brick version. Now I managed to make some better photos alongside an interactive digital 360° view for anyone interested.

 

– Photo Gallery –

 

Disclaimer: The Forwarder is my interpretation. Copyright of the original source material of course owned by John Deere.

Like and share this post:

Star Wars microscale models

These Star Wars models from the Freemaker Adventures and Rogue One were commissioned exclusively by Blocks magazine and have been showcased in issue 22 & 27 in 2016. The Freemaker ships have also been featured at The Brothers Brick.

 

 

There are digital versions of the Eclipse [micro] and the Scavenger [micro] available.

 

-Cole

 

Disclaimer: The Star Wars models are my interpretations. Copyright of the original source material of course owned by Disney and Lukas Films.

Like and share this post:

Bricks Culture 7 – Street Art & Lego pt. II

The actual issue of Bricks Culture contains the second part of the article series which examines the connection between Street Art, Graffiti and Lego bricks. This time the spotlight is on the ongoings in France. Alongside mentioning Graffiti writer Drop, Street Artist Lenz has a full length feature reviewing his extensive work. By coincidence Samsofy, a french Lego photographer, has an individual feature in the magazine. This is relevant as his work is sometimes also connected to Street Art, so naturally he is subject to a short observation from my side.

Later, when the article was in the final phase, I became aware of another french Street Artist named Terez TRZ who is also working with Lego bricks. Unfortunately due to the deadline I could not include him, but at least I’d like to mention him here.

So if you have an interest in this field, I’d strongly recommend you to grab yourself a copy. Besides, all the other articles are also definitely worth reading if you have an interest in what is beyond the bricks…

– Cole

brickscult-printsubslarge

Like and share this post: